When nietzsche wept book pdf

 

    Irvin Yalom virtuosity has a particular capacity to mix philosophy, literature, and psychiatry. Yalom’s books on psychotherapy are widely read around the world making him a highly acclaimed scholar. Yalom has also been internationally recognized as a fiction writer for his novels. Download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd. Flag for “When Nietzsche Wept is Irvin Yalom's next (psycho)logical step forward from Love's Executioner. A hardcover edition of this book was published in by Basic Books. When Nietzsche Wept - Yalom, Irvin - Ebook download as ePub .epub), Text File .txt) or read book online. When Nietzsche Wept - Yalom, Irvin.

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    When Nietzsche Wept Book Pdf

    When Nietzsche wept. byYalom, Irvin D., PublisherNew York, NY: Basic Books. Collectioninlibrary Borrow this book to access EPUB and PDF files. This essential book for front-line clinicians offers new ways of conceptualizing the techniques of group therapy for use on acute wards. Yalom makes a strong. Download PDF When Nietzsche Wept: A Novel of Obsession, PDF Book Details Author: Irvin D. Yalom Pages: Publisher: Harper.

    Plot[ edit ] The film opens with the Russian-born novelist—who eventually became a member of Freud's 'Vienna Circle'-- Lou Andreas-Salome Katheryn Winnick who had an unconsummated Platonic 'love affair' with German philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche Armand Assante , and to whom he allegedly proposed in although whether her claims are true is very much up for debate writing a letter to Dr Josef Breuer Ben Cross , after hearing of his newly developed talking cure Breuer was a friend of Sigmund Freud Jamie Elman , who also appears in the story, and one of the influential fathers of psychoanalysis. The two meet, and a reluctant and troubled Breuer agrees to Salome's plan; to cure the intense migraine attacks that plague Nietzsche, and at the same time, without his knowing, cure the despair that her refusal of marriage has inflicted upon him. Salome has persuaded Franz Overbeck Nietzsche's friend to send him to Breuer, however, Nietzsche offers no support to Breuer, so the course of treatment must end. In a chilling parallel, an encounter with a mistreated horse causes Nietzsche to redeem his appointment with Breuer Nietzsche finally went mad after stopping a man from whipping a horse using his own body, before breaking down in tears and descending into insanity. Nietzsche later visits a whorehouse , where he has another attack of migraine, exacerbated by the overuse of a sleeping draught. Nietzsche decides that he will, instead of pursuing treatment, leave for Basel. Meanwhile, an up-and-coming psychologist Sigmund Freud, friend of Josef and his spouse Mathilde Breuer, suggests that if Breuer was to make some confession to Nietzsche, he may stop seeing any positive sentiment shown as being a bid for power, and indulge in confessions of his own.

    Actions Shares. Embeds 0 No embeds. No notes for slide. When nietzsche wept a novel of obsession [ebook] download 1. When Nietzsche Wept: Book Details Author: Irvin D.

    Yalom Pages: Harper Perennial Modern Classics Brand: English ISBN: Publication Date: Description "Magical. A Novel of Obsession, click button download in the last page 5. Download or read When Nietzsche Wept: A Novel of Obsession OR. His reverie was interrupted by the sound of the door opening and closing in his outer office. Breuer waited a moment or two, so as not to appear overanxious, and then stepped into his waiting room to greet Lou Salom.

    She was wet, the Viennese drizzle having become a downpourbut before he could help her out of her dripping outer coat, she was shrugging it off by herself and handing it to his nurse and receptionist, Frau Becker. After ushering Fraulein Salom into his office and motioning her toward a heavy black leather- upholstered chair, Breuer sat down in the chair next to her.

    He couldnt help remarking, I see you prefer to do things for yourself. Doesnt that deprive men of the pleasure of serving you? We both know that some of the services men provide are not necessarily good for womens health! Your future husband will need extensive retraining. The habits of a lifetime are not easily extinguished.

    No, not for me! I have told you. Oh, perhaps a part-time marriagethat might suit me, but nothing more binding. Looking at his bold, beautiful visitor, Breuer could see much appeal in the idea of a part-time marriage.

    It was hard to keep in mind that she was only half his age. She wore a simple, long black dress buttoned high up to her neck, and a fur pelt with tiny fox face and feet was wrapped around her shoulders. Strange, Breuer thought, in cold Venice she discards her fur, yet clings to it in my overheated office.

    Still, it was time to get down to business. Now, Frulein, he said, let us take up the matter of your friends illness. Despairnot illness. I have several recommendations. May I share them with you? Is there no limit to her presumption? She speaks as though she were my confrrethe head of a clinic, a physician with thirty years of experiencenot an inexperienced schoolgirl.

    Calm down, Josef! She is very young, she doesnt worship the Viennese god, Decorum. Besides, she knows this Professor Nietzsche better than I do. Shes remarkably intelligent and may have something important to say.

    God knows I have no idea about curing despair: I cant cure my own. He answered calmly, Indeed, Fraulein. Please proceed. My brother, Jenia, whom I saw this morning, mentioned that you used mesmerism to help Anna O. I remember your telling me in Venice that this uncovering of the origin of each symptom somehow dissolved it. The how of this somehow intrigues me. Some day when we have more time, I hope that you will enlighten me about the precise mechanism through which arriving at the knowledge of the source eliminates the symptom.

    Breuer shook his head and waved his hands, palms toward Lou Salom. Its an empirical observation. Even had we all the time in the world to talk, Im afraid I could not provide you with the precision you seek. But your recommendations, Frulein? My first recommendation is: do not attempt this mesmerism method with Nietzsche.

    It would not be successful with him! His mind, his intellect, is a miracleone of the wonders of the world, as you will see for yourself. But he is, to borrow one of his favorite phrases, only human, all too human, and he has his own blind spots. Lou Salom now removed her fur, rose slowly, and walked across the office to place it on Breuer s sofa. She glanced for a moment at the framed diplomas hanging on the wall, adjusted one that hung slightly askew, and then sat down again and crossed her legs before going on.

    Nietzsche is extraordinarily sensitive to issues of power. He would refuse to engage in any process that he perceives as surrendering his power to another. He is attracted in his philosophy to the pre-Socratic Greeks, especially to their concept of Agonisthe belief that one develops ones natural gifts only through contestand he is deeply distrustful of the motives of anyone who forgoes contest and claims to be altruistic.

    His mentor in these matters was Schopenhauer. No one desires, he believes, to help another: instead, people wish only to dominate and increase their own power. The few times when he surrendered his power to another, hes ended up feeling devastated and enraged. It happened with Richard Wagner. I believe it is happening now with me. What do you mean, its happening with you? Is it true that you are, in some way, personally responsible for Professor Nietzsches great despair?

    He believes I am. That is why my second recommendation is: do not ally yourself with me. You look puzzledfor you to understand, I must tell you everything about my relationship to Nietzsche. I shall omit nothing and answer your every question with candor. This will not be easy.

    I place myself in your hands, but my words must remain our secret. Of course, you may count on that, Frulein, he replied, marveling at her directness, at how refreshing it was to converse with someone so open.

    Well, then. I first met Nietzsche approximately eight months ago, in April. Frau Becker knocked and entered with coffee. If she was surprised to see Breuer seated next to Lou Salom rather than in his customary place behind the desk, she gave no evidence of it. Without a word, she deposited a tray containing china, spoons, and a gleaming silver pot of coffee and quickly left.

    Breuer poured the coffee as Lou Salom continued. I left Russia last year because of my healtha respiratory condition which is now much improved. I first lived in Zurich and studied theology with Biederman and also worked with the poet Gottfried KinkelI dont think Ive mentioned that Im an aspiring poet.

    When my mother and I moved to Rome early this year, Kinkel provided a letter of introduction to Malwida von Meysenburg. You know hershe wrote Memoirs of an Idealist. Breuer nodded. He was familiar with Malwida von Meysenbugs work, especially with her crusades for womens rights, radical political reform, and diverse transformations in the educational process.

    He was less comfortable with her recent antimaterialistic tracts, which he thought based on pseudoscientific claims. Lou Salom continued, So I went to Malwidas literary salon and there met a charming and brilliant philosopher, Paul Re, with whom I became quite friendly.

    Herr Re had attended Nietzsches classes at Basel many years before, and thereafter the two had maintained a close friendship. I could see that Herr Re admired Nietzsche over all other men. Soon he developed the notion that, if he and I were friends, then Nietzsche and I must also become friends.

    PaulHerr Rebut, Doctorshe flushed for only an instant, but long enough for Breuer to notice, and for her to notice him noticing allow me to call him Paul, since that is how I address him, and today we have no time for social niceties. Im very close to Paul, though Ill never immolate myself in marriage to him or to anyone!

    But, she went on impatiently, I have spent enough time explaining a brief involuntary flushing of my face. Arent we the only animals that blush? At a loss for words, Breuer could muster only a nod.

    For a while, surrounded by his medical paraphernalia, he had felt more powerful than during their last talk. But now, exposed to the power of her charm, he felt his strength slipping away. Her comment about her blush was remarkable: never in his life had he heard a woman, or anyone else for that matter, speak of social intercourse with such directness. And she was only twenty-one years old! Paul was convinced that Nietzsche and I would become fast friends, Lou Salom continued, that we were perfect for one another.

    He wanted me to become Nietzsches student, protge, and counterfoil. He wanted Nietzsche to be my teacher, my secular priest. They were interrupted by a light knock on the door. Breuer rose to open it, and Frau Becker whispered loudly that a new patient had entered. Breuer sat down again and reassured Lou Salom that they had ample time, for unannounced patients expect long delays, and urged her to go on.

    Well, she continued, Paul arranged a meeting at Saint Peter s Basilica, the most unlikely place for the rendezvous of our unholy Trinitythe name we later adopted for ourselves, though Nietzsche often referred to it as a Pythagorean relationship. Breuer caught himself gazing at his visitor s bosom rather than at her face.

    How long, he wondered, have I been doing that? Has she noticed? Have other women noticed me doing that? In his imagination, he grabbed a broom and swept away all sexual thoughts. He concentrated harder on her eyes and her words. I was immediately attracted to Nietzsche.

    Hes not an imposing man physicallymedium height, with a gentle voice and unblinking eyes that look inward rather than out, as if he were protecting some inner treasure. I didnt know then that he is three-quarters blind. Still, there was something extraordinarily compelling about him. The first words he spoke to me were: From what stars have we dropped down to each other here? Then the three of us started to talk.

    And what talk! For a time, it appeared that Pauls hopes for a friendship or mentorship between Nietzsche and me would be realized. Intellectually, we were a perfect fit. We folded into each other s mindshe said we had twin brother-sister brains.

    Ah, he read aloud the jewels of his last book, he set my poems to music, he told me what he was going to offer the world during the next ten yearshe believed that his health would grant him no more than a decade. Soon Paul, Nietzsche, and I decided we should live together in a mnage trois.

    We began to make plans to spend this winter in Vienna or possibly Paris. A mnage trois! Breuer cleared his throat and shifted uneasily in his chair.

    He saw her smiling at his discomfiture. Is there nothing she misses? What a diagnostician this woman would make! Has she ever considered a career in medicine? Might she, as my student? My protge? My colleague, working by my side in the consulting room, the laboratory? This fantasy had power, real powerbut her words shook Breuer out of it. Yes, I know the world doesnt smile upon two men and a woman living chastely together. She accented chastely superblyhard enough to set matters right, yet soft enough to avoid rebuke.

    But we are free-thinking idealists who reject socially imposed restrictions. We believe in our capability to create our own moral structure. As Breuer did not respond, his visitor appeared, for the first time, uncertain how to proceed. Shall I continue? Do we have time? Am I offending you? Continue, please, gndiges Fraulein.

    First, I have set aside the time for you.

    When Nietzsche wept

    He reached across his desk, held up his calender, and pointed to the large L. You see I have nothing else scheduled this afternoon. And secondly, you are not offending me. On the contrary, I admire your candor, your forthrightness.

    Would that all friends spoke so honestly! Life would be richer and more genuine. Accepting his praise without comment, Lou Salom poured herself more coffee and continued with her story. First, I should make clear that my relationship with Nietzsche, though intense, was brief. We met only four times, and were almost always chaperoned by my mother, by Pauls mother, or by Nietzsches sister. In fact, Nietzsche and I were seldom alone for walks or conversations. The intellectual honeymoon of our unholy Trinity was also brief.

    Fissures appeared. Then romantic and lustful feelings. Perhaps they were present from the very beginning. Perhaps I should take responsibility for failing to recognize them. She shook herself as if to doff that responsibility, and went on to recount a crucial sequence of events. Toward the end of our first meeting, Nietzsche grew concerned about my plan for a chaste mnage trois, thinking the world not ready for it, and asked me to keep our plan secret.

    When Nietzsche Wept : A Novel of Obsession by Irvin D. Yalom (1993, Paperback)

    He was especially concerned about his family: under no circumstances must his mother or his sister learn about us. Such conventionality! I was surprised and disappointed, and wondered if Id been misled by his courageous language and his free-thinking proclamations.

    Shortly afterward, Nietzsche arrived at an even stronger positionthat such a living arrangement would be socially dangerous for me, perhaps even ruinous. And, in order to protect me, he said he had decided to propose marriage, and asked Paul to convey his offer to me. Can you imagine the position that put Paul in?

    But Paul, out of loyalty to his frienddutifully, though a bit phlegmatically told me of Nietzsches proposal. Did it surprise you? Breuer asked. Very muchespecially coming after our very first visit. It also unsettled me. Nietzsche is a great man and has a gentleness, a power, an extraordinary presence; I dont deny, Doctor Breuer, that I was strongly attracted to himbut not romantically.

    Perhaps he sensed my attraction to him and did not believe my assertion that marriage was as far from my mind as romance. A sudden gust of wind rattling the windows distracted Breuer for a moment.

    He suddenly felt stiff in neck and shoulders. He had been listening so intently that for several minutes he had not moved a muscle.

    Occasionally patients had talked to him of personal issues, but never like this. Never face to face, never so unblinkingly. Bertha had revealed a great deal, but always in an absent state of mind. Lou Salom was present and, even when describing remote events, created such moments of intimacy that Breuer felt they were lovers talking. He had no trouble understanding why Nietzsche would propose marriage to her after only a single meeting.

    And then, Frulein? Then I resolved to be more frank when we next met. But it turned out to be unnecessary. Nietzsche quickly realized that he was as frightened by the prospect of marriage as I was repelled by it.

    When I next saw him, two weeks later in Orta, his first words to me were that I must disregard his proposal. He urged me instead to join him in pursuit of the ideal relationshippassionate, chaste, intellectual, and nonmarital. The three of us reconciled. Nietzsche was in such high spirits about our mnage trois that he insisted, one afternoon in Lucerne, that we pose for thisthe only picture of our unholy Trinity.

    In the photograph she handed Breuer, two men were standing before a cart; she was kneeling inside it, brandishing a small whip. The man in the front, with the mustache, gazing upwardthats Nietzsche, she said warmly. The other one is Paul. Breuer inspected the photograph carefully.

    It disturbed him to see these two menpathetic, shackled giantsharnessed by this beautiful young woman and her tiny whip.

    What do you think of my stable, Doctor Breuer? For the first time, one of her gay comments missed its mark, and Breuer was reminded suddenly that she was only a twenty-one-year-old girl. He felt uncomfortablehe did not like to see seams in this polished creature. His heart went out to the two men in bondagehis brothers.

    Surely he could have been one of them. His visitor must have sensed her misstep, Breuer thought, noticing how she rushed to continue her narrative. We met twice more, in Tautenberg, about three months ago, with Nietzsches sister and then in Leipzig with Pauls mother. But Nietzsche wrote me continually. Heres a letter, in which he responded to my telling him how moved I was by his book Dawn. Breuer quickly read the short letter she handed him. My dear Lou, I, too, have dawns about me, and not painted ones!

    Something I no longer believed possible, to find a friend for my ultimate happiness and suffering, now seems to me possiblethe golden possibility on the horizon of my whole future life. I am moved whenever I so much as think of the bold and rich soul of my dear Lou.

    Breuer kept silent. Now he felt an even greater bond of empathy with Nietzsche. To find dawns and golden possibilities, to love a rich, bold soul: everyone needs that, he thought, at least once in a lifetime. During this same time, Lou continued, Paul began to write equally ardent letters. And despite my best mediating efforts, the tension within our Trinity increased alarmingly.

    The friendship between Paul and Nietzsche was disintegrating quickly. Ultimately they began to disparage each other in their letters to me. But surely, Breuer interjected, this comes as no surprise to you? Two ardent men in an intimate relation with the same woman? Perhaps I was nave. I believed that we three could share a life of the mind, that we could do serious philosophical work together.

    Apparently unsettled by Breuer s question, she rose, stretched slightly, and sauntered to the window, stopping on the way to inspect some of the objects on his deska Renaissance bronze mortar and pestle, a small Egyptian funerary figure, an intricate wooden model of the semicircular canals of the inner ear.

    Perhaps Im obstinate, she said, looking out the window, but I am still not convinced that our mnage trois was impossible! It might have worked had it not been for the interference of Nietzsches odious sister. Nietzsche invited me to spend the summer with him and Elisabeth in Tautenberg, a small village in Thringen. She and I met at Bayreuth, where we met Wagner and attended a performance of Parsifal.

    Then together we journeyed to Tautenberg. Why do you call her odious, Frulein? Elisabeth is a divisive, mean-spirited, dishonest, anti-Semitic goose. When I made the mistake of telling her Paul is Jewish, she took pains to make this known to Wagner s entire circle in order to ensure that Paul would never be welcome in Bayreuth.

    Breuer put down his coffee cup. While at first Lou Salom had lulled him into the sweet safe realm of love, art, and philosophy, now her words jarred him back to reality, to the ugly world of anti- Semitism. That very morning he had read in the Neue Freie Presse a story about fraternities of youths roaming the university, entering the classrooms, shouting Juden hinaus! Jews get out and forcing all Jews out of the lecture hallsphysically pulling anyone who resisted. Frulein, I, too, am Jewish, and must inquire whether Professor Nietzsche shares his sister s anti- Jewish views?

    I know youre Jewish. Jenia told me. Its important that you know Nietzsche cares only about truth. He hates the lie of prejudiceall prejudice. He hates his sister s anti-Semitism. He is appalled and disgusted that Bernard Frster, one of Germanys most outspoken and virulent anti-Semites, often visits her. His sister, Elisabeth. Now her words came faster, the pitch of her voice rising an octave. Breuer could tell that she knew she was straying from her prepared narrative, but could not stop herself.

    Elisabeth, Doctor Breuer, is a horror. She called me a prostitute. She lied to Nietzsche and told him that I showed everyone that photo and bragged about how he loves the taste of my whip. She always lies! She is a dangerous woman. Some day, mark my words, she will do Nietzsche great damage! Still standing, she held tightly to the back of a chair as she spoke these words. Then, sitting, she continued more calmly, As you may imagine, my three weeks at Tautenberg with Nietzsche and Elisabeth were complex.

    My time alone with him was sublime. Wonderful walks and deep conversations about everythingsometimes his health permitted him to talk ten hours a day! Of course, you may count on that, Frulein, he replied, marveling at her directness, at how refreshing it was to converse with someone so open. Well, then. I first met Nietzsche approximately eight months ago, in April. Frau Becker knocked and entered with coffee.

    If she was surprised to see Breuer seated next to Lou Salom rather than in his customary place behind the desk, she gave no evidence of it. Without a word, she deposited a tray containing china, spoons, and a gleaming silver pot of coffee and quickly left.

    Breuer poured the coffee as Lou Salom continued. I left Russia last year because of my healtha respiratory condition which is now much improved. I first lived in Zurich and studied theology with Biederman and also worked with the poet Gottfried KinkelI dont think Ive mentioned that Im an aspiring poet. When my mother and I moved to Rome early this year, Kinkel provided a letter of introduction to Malwida von Meysenburg.

    You know hershe wrote Memoirs of an Idealist. Breuer nodded. He was familiar with Malwida von Meysenbugs work, especially with her crusades for womens rights, radical political reform, and diverse transformations in the educational process. He was less comfortable with her recent antimaterialistic tracts, which he thought based on pseudoscientific claims. Lou Salom continued, So I went to Malwidas literary salon and there met a charming and brilliant philosopher, Paul Re, with whom I became quite friendly.

    Herr Re had attended Nietzsches classes at Basel many years before, and thereafter the two had maintained a close friendship. I could see that Herr Re admired Nietzsche over all other men. Soon he developed the notion that, if he and I were friends, then Nietzsche and I must also become friends.

    PaulHerr Rebut, Doctorshe flushed for only an instant, but long enough for Breuer to notice, and for her to notice him noticing allow me to call him Paul, since that is how I address him, and today we have no time for social niceties. Im very close to Paul, though Ill never immolate myself in marriage to him or to anyone! But, she went on impatiently, I have spent enough time explaining a brief involuntary flushing of my face.

    Arent we the only animals that blush? At a loss for words, Breuer could muster only a nod. For a while, surrounded by his medical paraphernalia, he had felt more powerful than during their last talk. But now, exposed to the power of her charm, he felt his strength slipping away.

    Her comment about her blush was remarkable: never in his life had he heard a woman, or anyone else for that matter, speak of social intercourse with such directness. And she was only twenty-one years old! Paul was convinced that Nietzsche and I would become fast friends, Lou Salom continued, that we were perfect for one another. He wanted me to become Nietzsches student, protge, and counterfoil.

    He wanted Nietzsche to be my teacher, my secular priest. They were interrupted by a light knock on the door. Breuer rose to open it, and Frau Becker whispered loudly that a new patient had entered.

    Breuer sat down again and reassured Lou Salom that they had ample time, for unannounced patients expect long delays, and urged her to go on. Well, she continued, Paul arranged a meeting at Saint Peter s Basilica, the most unlikely place for the rendezvous of our unholy Trinitythe name we later adopted for ourselves, though Nietzsche often referred to it as a Pythagorean relationship.

    Breuer caught himself gazing at his visitor s bosom rather than at her face. How long, he wondered, have I been doing that? Has she noticed? Have other women noticed me doing that? In his imagination, he grabbed a broom and swept away all sexual thoughts. He concentrated harder on her eyes and her words. I was immediately attracted to Nietzsche.

    Hes not an imposing man physicallymedium height, with a gentle voice and unblinking eyes that look inward rather than out, as if he were protecting some inner treasure. I didnt know then that he is three-quarters blind. Still, there was something extraordinarily compelling about him. The first words he spoke to me were: From what stars have we dropped down to each other here?

    Then the three of us started to talk. And what talk! For a time, it appeared that Pauls hopes for a friendship or mentorship between Nietzsche and me would be realized. Intellectually, we were a perfect fit. We folded into each other s mindshe said we had twin brother-sister brains. Ah, he read aloud the jewels of his last book, he set my poems to music, he told me what he was going to offer the world during the next ten yearshe believed that his health would grant him no more than a decade.

    Soon Paul, Nietzsche, and I decided we should live together in a mnage trois. We began to make plans to spend this winter in Vienna or possibly Paris.

    A mnage trois! Breuer cleared his throat and shifted uneasily in his chair. He saw her smiling at his discomfiture. Is there nothing she misses? What a diagnostician this woman would make! Has she ever considered a career in medicine? Might she, as my student? My protge? My colleague, working by my side in the consulting room, the laboratory? This fantasy had power, real powerbut her words shook Breuer out of it. Yes, I know the world doesnt smile upon two men and a woman living chastely together.

    She accented chastely superblyhard enough to set matters right, yet soft enough to avoid rebuke. But we are free-thinking idealists who reject socially imposed restrictions.

    We believe in our capability to create our own moral structure. As Breuer did not respond, his visitor appeared, for the first time, uncertain how to proceed. Shall I continue? Do we have time? Am I offending you? Continue, please, gndiges Fraulein. First, I have set aside the time for you. He reached across his desk, held up his calender, and pointed to the large L. You see I have nothing else scheduled this afternoon. And secondly, you are not offending me. On the contrary, I admire your candor, your forthrightness.

    Would that all friends spoke so honestly! Life would be richer and more genuine. Accepting his praise without comment, Lou Salom poured herself more coffee and continued with her story. First, I should make clear that my relationship with Nietzsche, though intense, was brief.

    We met only four times, and were almost always chaperoned by my mother, by Pauls mother, or by Nietzsches sister. In fact, Nietzsche and I were seldom alone for walks or conversations. The intellectual honeymoon of our unholy Trinity was also brief. Fissures appeared. Then romantic and lustful feelings. Perhaps they were present from the very beginning. Perhaps I should take responsibility for failing to recognize them.

    She shook herself as if to doff that responsibility, and went on to recount a crucial sequence of events. Toward the end of our first meeting, Nietzsche grew concerned about my plan for a chaste mnage trois, thinking the world not ready for it, and asked me to keep our plan secret.

    He was especially concerned about his family: under no circumstances must his mother or his sister learn about us. Such conventionality!

    I was surprised and disappointed, and wondered if Id been misled by his courageous language and his free-thinking proclamations. Shortly afterward, Nietzsche arrived at an even stronger positionthat such a living arrangement would be socially dangerous for me, perhaps even ruinous.

    And, in order to protect me, he said he had decided to propose marriage, and asked Paul to convey his offer to me. Can you imagine the position that put Paul in?

    But Paul, out of loyalty to his frienddutifully, though a bit phlegmatically told me of Nietzsches proposal. Did it surprise you? Breuer asked. Very muchespecially coming after our very first visit. It also unsettled me. Nietzsche is a great man and has a gentleness, a power, an extraordinary presence; I dont deny, Doctor Breuer, that I was strongly attracted to himbut not romantically. Perhaps he sensed my attraction to him and did not believe my assertion that marriage was as far from my mind as romance.

    A sudden gust of wind rattling the windows distracted Breuer for a moment. He suddenly felt stiff in neck and shoulders. He had been listening so intently that for several minutes he had not moved a muscle. Occasionally patients had talked to him of personal issues, but never like this. Never face to face, never so unblinkingly. Bertha had revealed a great deal, but always in an absent state of mind. Lou Salom was present and, even when describing remote events, created such moments of intimacy that Breuer felt they were lovers talking.

    He had no trouble understanding why Nietzsche would propose marriage to her after only a single meeting. And then, Frulein? Then I resolved to be more frank when we next met. But it turned out to be unnecessary. Nietzsche quickly realized that he was as frightened by the prospect of marriage as I was repelled by it. When I next saw him, two weeks later in Orta, his first words to me were that I must disregard his proposal. He urged me instead to join him in pursuit of the ideal relationshippassionate, chaste, intellectual, and nonmarital.

    The three of us reconciled. Nietzsche was in such high spirits about our mnage trois that he insisted, one afternoon in Lucerne, that we pose for thisthe only picture of our unholy Trinity. In the photograph she handed Breuer, two men were standing before a cart; she was kneeling inside it, brandishing a small whip. The man in the front, with the mustache, gazing upwardthats Nietzsche, she said warmly. The other one is Paul. Breuer inspected the photograph carefully. It disturbed him to see these two menpathetic, shackled giantsharnessed by this beautiful young woman and her tiny whip.

    What do you think of my stable, Doctor Breuer? For the first time, one of her gay comments missed its mark, and Breuer was reminded suddenly that she was only a twenty-one-year-old girl. He felt uncomfortablehe did not like to see seams in this polished creature. His heart went out to the two men in bondagehis brothers. Surely he could have been one of them. His visitor must have sensed her misstep, Breuer thought, noticing how she rushed to continue her narrative.

    We met twice more, in Tautenberg, about three months ago, with Nietzsches sister and then in Leipzig with Pauls mother. But Nietzsche wrote me continually. Heres a letter, in which he responded to my telling him how moved I was by his book Dawn. Breuer quickly read the short letter she handed him.

    My dear Lou, I, too, have dawns about me, and not painted ones! Something I no longer believed possible, to find a friend for my ultimate happiness and suffering, now seems to me possiblethe golden possibility on the horizon of my whole future life. I am moved whenever I so much as think of the bold and rich soul of my dear Lou. Breuer kept silent. Now he felt an even greater bond of empathy with Nietzsche. To find dawns and golden possibilities, to love a rich, bold soul: everyone needs that, he thought, at least once in a lifetime.

    During this same time, Lou continued, Paul began to write equally ardent letters. And despite my best mediating efforts, the tension within our Trinity increased alarmingly. The friendship between Paul and Nietzsche was disintegrating quickly. Ultimately they began to disparage each other in their letters to me. But surely, Breuer interjected, this comes as no surprise to you? Two ardent men in an intimate relation with the same woman?

    Perhaps I was nave. I believed that we three could share a life of the mind, that we could do serious philosophical work together. Apparently unsettled by Breuer s question, she rose, stretched slightly, and sauntered to the window, stopping on the way to inspect some of the objects on his deska Renaissance bronze mortar and pestle, a small Egyptian funerary figure, an intricate wooden model of the semicircular canals of the inner ear.

    Perhaps Im obstinate, she said, looking out the window, but I am still not convinced that our mnage trois was impossible! It might have worked had it not been for the interference of Nietzsches odious sister.

    When Nietzsche wept (eBook, ) [neogosynchpromath.cf]

    Nietzsche invited me to spend the summer with him and Elisabeth in Tautenberg, a small village in Thringen. She and I met at Bayreuth, where we met Wagner and attended a performance of Parsifal. Then together we journeyed to Tautenberg. Why do you call her odious, Frulein? Elisabeth is a divisive, mean-spirited, dishonest, anti-Semitic goose. When I made the mistake of telling her Paul is Jewish, she took pains to make this known to Wagner s entire circle in order to ensure that Paul would never be welcome in Bayreuth.

    Breuer put down his coffee cup. While at first Lou Salom had lulled him into the sweet safe realm of love, art, and philosophy, now her words jarred him back to reality, to the ugly world of anti- Semitism. That very morning he had read in the Neue Freie Presse a story about fraternities of youths roaming the university, entering the classrooms, shouting Juden hinaus!

    Jews get out and forcing all Jews out of the lecture hallsphysically pulling anyone who resisted. Frulein, I, too, am Jewish, and must inquire whether Professor Nietzsche shares his sister s anti- Jewish views? I know youre Jewish.

    Jenia told me. Its important that you know Nietzsche cares only about truth. He hates the lie of prejudiceall prejudice. He hates his sister s anti-Semitism. He is appalled and disgusted that Bernard Frster, one of Germanys most outspoken and virulent anti-Semites, often visits her. His sister, Elisabeth. Now her words came faster, the pitch of her voice rising an octave.

    Breuer could tell that she knew she was straying from her prepared narrative, but could not stop herself. Elisabeth, Doctor Breuer, is a horror. She called me a prostitute. She lied to Nietzsche and told him that I showed everyone that photo and bragged about how he loves the taste of my whip. She always lies! She is a dangerous woman.

    Some day, mark my words, she will do Nietzsche great damage! Still standing, she held tightly to the back of a chair as she spoke these words. Then, sitting, she continued more calmly, As you may imagine, my three weeks at Tautenberg with Nietzsche and Elisabeth were complex. My time alone with him was sublime. Wonderful walks and deep conversations about everythingsometimes his health permitted him to talk ten hours a day!

    I wonder if ever before there has been such philosophical openness between two persons. We talked about the relativity of good and evil, about the necessity to free oneself from public morality in order to live morally, about a freethinker s religion.

    Nietzsches words seemed true: we had sibling brains we could say so much to one another with half-words, half-sentences, mere gestures. Yet this paradise was spoiled, because all the while we were under the eye of his serpent sisterI could see her listening, always misunderstanding, scheming. Tell me, why would Elisabeth slander you? Because shes fighting for her life. She is a small-minded, spiritually impoverished woman. She cannot afford to lose her brother to another woman.

    She realizes Nietzsche is, and will forever be, her sole source of significance. She glanced at her watch and then at the closed door. Im concerned about the time, so Ill tell you the rest quickly.

    Just last month, despite Elisabeths objections, Paul, Nietzsche, and I spent three weeks in Leipzig with Pauls mother, where we once again had serious philosophical discussions, particularly about the development of religious belief.

    We parted only two weeks ago, with Nietzsche still believing we three would spend the spring living together in Paris. But it will never be, I know that now. His sister succeeded in poisoning his mind against me, and recently he began sending letters full of despair and hatred for both Paul and me. And now, today, Fraulein Salom, where do things stand?

    Everything has deteriorated. Paul and Nietzsche have become enemies. Paul grows angry every time he reads Nietzsches letters to me, every time he hears of any tender feelings I have for Nietzsche. Paul reads your letters? Yes, why not? Our friendship has grown deeper. I suspect I will always be close to him. We have no secrets from one another: we even read one another s diaries. Paul has been entreating me to break off with Nietzsche. Finally I acquiesced and wrote Nietzsche that though I shall always treasure our friendship, our mnage trois was no longer possible.

    I told him that there was too much pain, too much destructive influencefrom his sister, from his mother, from the quarrels between him and Paul. He writes crazed letters, sometimes insulting 01 threatening, sometimes deeply despairing. Here, look at these passages Ive received just this past week!

    She held out two letters whose appearance even showed agitation: the uneven script, the many words abbreviated or underlined several times. Breuer squinted at the paragraphs she had circled, but then, unable to make out more than a few words, handed them back to her. I forgot, she said, how difficult it is to read his script. Let me decipher this one addressed to both Paul and me: Dont let my outbreaks of megalomania or wounded vanity bother you too much and if I should one day happen to take my own life in some fit of passion, there wouldnt be anything in that to worry about overmuch.

    What are my fantasies to you! I came to this reasonable view of the situation after I had takenfrom despairan enormous dose of opium She broke off. Thats enough to give you an idea of his despair. Ive been staying at Pauls family estate in Bavaria for several weeks now, so all my mail comes there.

    Paul has been destroying his most vitriolic letters in order to spare me pain, but this one to me alone slipped through: If I banish you from me now, it is a frightful censure of your whole being. You have caused damage, you have done harmand not only to me but to all the people who have loved me: this sword hangs over you. She looked up at Breuer.

    Now, Doctor, do you see why I so strongly recommend that you dont ally yourself with me in any way? Breuer drew deep upon his cigar. Though intrigued by Lou Salom and absorbed in the melodrama she was unfolding, he was troubled.

    Was it wise to have agreed to enter into it? What a jungle! What primitive and powerful relationships: the unholy Trinity, Nietzsches ruptured friendship with Paul, the powerful connection between Nietzsche and his sister. And the viciousness between her and Lou Salom: I must take care, he told himself, to stay out of the way of those thunderbolts.

    Most explosive of all, of course, is Nietzsches desperate love, now turned to hatred, for Lou Salom. But it was too late to turn back. He had committed himself and in Venice had blithely told her, I have never refused to treat the sick.

    He turned back to Lou Salom. These letters help me understand your alarm, Frulein Salom. I share your concern about your friend: his stability seems precarious, and suicide a real possibility.

    But since you now have little influence over Professor Nietzsche, how can you persuade him to visit me? Yes, that is a problemone I have been considering at length. Even my name is poison to him now, and I shall have to work indirectly. That means, of course, that he must never, never know of my having arranged a meeting with you. You must never tell him! But now that I know you are willing to meet with him She put down her cup and looked so intently at Breuer that he had to reply quickly: Of course, Fraulein.

    As I said to you in Venice, I have never refused to treat the sick.